Software, Windows

I’m not going to share…


Even you haven’t shared any of your files or folders on your machine, there’s is still a way which another user could access your folders remotely.

You can check through here to see the which drives and folders shared in your PC: Go to ‘Control Panel’ > ‘Administrative Tools’ > ‘Computer Management’. Under ‘Shared Folders’, click on ‘Shares.

Now, if there is someone with administrative privileges has a weak password then the hidden shares will be accessible to anyone who logs on to the network. You could just disable this with a simple steps through registry editor if you have no use of these hidden shares.

Click on ‘Start’ > ‘Run’ and type “regedit” and click OK to open the Registry Editor.

Search for this key: HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINESystemCurrentControlSetServiceslanmanserverparameters

Click on ‘Edit’ > ‘New’ > ‘DWORD Value’

Name it ‘AutoShareWks’, double click on it and assign it a value of ‘0’.

Click on OK, close the Registry Editor and restart your system.

If you want to share the files but to certain user, you could try these steps:

To set, view, change, or remove file and folder permissions

  1. Open Windows Explorer, and then locate the file or folder for which you want to set permissions.
  2. Right-click the file or folder, click Properties, and then click the Security tab.
  3. Do one of the following:
    • To set permissions for a group or user that does not appear in the Group or user names box, click Add. Type the name of the group or user you want to set permissions for and then click OK.
    • To change or remove permissions from an existing group or user, click the name of the group or user.
  4. Do one of the following:
    • To allow or deny a permission, in the Permissions for User or Group box, select the Allow or Deny check box.
    • To remove the group or user from the Group or user names box, click Remove.

Notes

  • To open Windows Explorer, click Start, point to All Programs, point to Accessories, and then click Windows Explorer.
  • In Windows XP Professional, the Everyone group no longer includes Anonymous Logon.
  • You can set file and folder permissions only on drives formatted to use NTFS.
  • To change permissions, you must be the owner or have been granted permission to do so by the owner.
  • Groups or users granted Full Control for a folder can delete files and subfolders within that folder regardless of the permissions protecting the files and subfolders.
  • If the check boxes under Permissions for user or group are shaded or if the Remove button is unavailable, then the file or folder has inherited permissions from the parent folder. For more information on how inheritance affects files and folders, see Related Topics.
  • When adding a new user or group, by default, this user or group will have Read & Execute, List Folder Contents, and Read permissions.

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2 Comments

  • Reply I’m not going to share… | Nicky81's Weblog October 17, 2015 at 7:45 AM

    […] Even you haven’t shared any of your files or folders on your machine, there’s is still a way which another user could access your folders remotely. You can check through here to see the which drives and folders shared in your PC: Go to ‘Control Panel’ > ‘Administrative Tools’ > ‘Computer Read more… […]

  • Reply Cheyanne January 29, 2017 at 12:47 PM

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